Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #43–Less is More

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, the theme Amy gave us is:

“Less is More.”

 

We have heard of this phrase often. When I saw this theme, I was curious of the origin of the expression. The research took me to several places and I wanted to trace the origin. This is what I found out:

This is a 19th century proverbial phrase. It is first found in print in Andrea del Sarto, 1855, a poem by Robert Browning written to Lucrezia:

“Who strive – you don’t know how the others strive
To paint a little thing like that you smeared
Carelessly passing with your robes afloat,-
Yet do much less, so much less, Someone says,
(I know his name, no matter) – so much less!
Well, less is more, Lucrezia.”

 

The phrase is often associated with the architect and furniture designer Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe (1886-1969), one of the founders of modern architecture and a proponent of simplicity of style.

Simple architecture in Kyoto, Japan.

1.IMG_2683

Kasugataisya Shrine

1.1

Kasugataisya Shrine

2.IMG_2350

Modern building, Downtown Kyoto

 

Along the line of less or simple, here is a quote from a poet.

“Simplicity is the glory of expression.” Walt Whitman

5.IMG_9664

 

Simplicity for children:

“Children will not remember you for the material things you provided but for the feeling you cherished them.” – Richard L. Evans

 

 

 

7

Mercy and Autumn had fun with paper hats

 

We often say, stop and “smell the roses,” but originally it was “smell the flowers,” a saying by Walt Hagan, the American professional golfer and a major figure in golf in the first half of the 20th century.

“You’re only here for a short visit. Don’t hurry, don’t worry. And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.” 1956 The Walter Hagen Story

 

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #43 – Less is More

 

29 comments

Leave a Reply to Miriam Hurdle Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.