Delilah by Kaye Lynne Booth – Blog Tour Day 1

Happy Spring, my friends!

It’s my pleasure to welcome Kaye to my blog today to celebrate her new release of Delilah–Book 1 of the Women in the West Adventure Series. In this post, she’ll share the story behind writing Delilah.

If you like strong and capable female protagonists, you’ll love Delilah.

Delilah Giveaway!

Kaye is giving away two digital copies, and one signed print copy of

Delilah

Leave a comment to enter. Multiple entries are allowed. So, leave a comment at each stop for more chances.

About the Book

Delilah is a woman haunted by her past.

Her homecoming from prison quickly turns into a quest for vengeance when she is brutally raped and left for dead, and her fourteen-year-old ward is abducted. Sheer will and determination take this tough and gritty heroine up against wild beasts of the forest, Indians and outlaws to Leadville, Colorado.

Can the colorful inhabitants of the Colorado mining town work their way into Delilah’s heart, offering a chance for a future she thought she’d lost along with her innocence?

Writing Delilah – strong female characters right out of history

One of the cool things about Delilah and the Women in the West adventure series is the fact that there is a true-life historical female character in a supporting role, along with a strong female protagonist in each book. In Delilah, the supporting character is Elizabeth “Baby Doe” McCourt Tabor, dubbed Colorado’s Silver Queen, who was prominent if the slightly notorious, figure in helping to turn Leadville from a ‘tent city’ mining camp into a prominent Colorado town. In the story, Baby Doe hires Delilah to assist in the preparations for the grand opening of the Tabor Grand Opera House in 1882, and she pops in on pivotal scenes throughout the story. You might say that she’s the smart lady behind the scenes, who keeps the story moving smoothly but keeps back out of the spotlight.

Elizabeth ‘Baby Doe’ McCourt Tabor – From Rags, to Riches, and Back to Rags

Born Elizabeth ‘Lizzy’ Bonduel McCourt – youngest of fourteen siblings – father was a storekeeper/ tailor?  in Oshkosh, Wisconsin– married Harvey Doe in 1877, and came west to Central City. Harvey was either unwilling or unable to work the mines, so she traded in her dresses for miner’s garb and worked the horse-drawn hoists in the mine owned by Harvey’s father, acquiring the nickname of “Baby” Doe from the miners, who admired her gumption.

Harvey abandoned her in Blackhawk in 1879, when he learned she was pregnant and accused her of stepping out on him but returned to take her to Denver and make amends in 1880 after the child had been stillborn. It was short lived, and they were divorced 1880, after discovering Henry in a brothel. Once divorced, Elizabeth decided to try opening a clothing store in Leadville with a friend.

There, she caught the eye of H. W. Tabor (State Senator) in 1879, a public figure who struck it rich in the mining industry when he invested in the Little Pittsburg and Matchless Mines. Their scandalous liaison was public knowledge, as Horrace was still married to his first wife, Augusta, and Baby Doe was freshly divorced. A May/December romance, he was forty-nine and she was twenty-five. Tabor divorced wife, Augusta, and he and Elizabeth were married privately in 1882 in St. Loius, and publicly the following year in Washington D.C.

Baby Doe was still shunned by the women of both Denver and Leadville society, in spite of the contributions to both cities. In Leadville, the Tabors built the first three story buildings, the Clarendon Hotel and the Tabor Grand Opera House, bringing culture and gas lighting to the untamed mining town. Regardless, the Tabors lived in style in a lavish mansion, throwing lavish parties, and entertaining the crème of the societal crop, and the couple was dubbed “The Silver King & Queen”.

View of the Matchless Mine, 1950 – Courtesy of the Denver Public Library, X-6124

Following the de-monetization of silver in1893, the Tabors lost their fortune, and Horrace died in 1899. The Matchless Mine produced more than $11 million in silver. She lived over thirty years in Leadville, in the caretaker’s cabin, outside the Matchless Mine, chopping wood, hauling water and trying to work the mine herself.

Her frozen body was found in the cabin following a blizzard. Although many say that she froze to death, it is likely that she died of a heart attack and the fire in the potbellied stove went out after she was already dead and no longer stoked it.

Baby Doe died alone and penniless, at the age of 81 in March of 1935, leaving two daughters behind, who had deserted her long ago. Her ‘tenacity and pioneering spirit earned her a place in the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame, and her life is immortalized in the opera, The Ballad of Baby Doe.

References

Martinek, Marcia. (9/26/2018) Baby Doe myths to be debunked at NMHFM. Leadville Herald Democrat. Retrieved from https://www.leadvilleherald.com/free_content/article_843bb678-c1c4-11e8-9534-b34426dfd5ea.html

Varnell, Jeanne. Elizabeth “Baby Doe” Tabor. Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame. Excerpt from Women of Consequence. Retrieved from https://www.cogreatwomen.org/project/elizabeth-baby-doe-tabor/

Elizabeth “Baby Doe” McCourt Tabor: Colorado’s Silver Queen. History Colorado. Colorado Virtual Library. Retrieved from https://www.coloradovirtuallibrary.org/digital-colorado/colorado-histories/boom-years/elizabeth-baby-doe-mccourt-tabor-colorados-silver-queen/

Mauck, Sydney. (4/1/2021) The Silver Queen of Cloud City: The Spectacular Rise-And Fall- of Baby Doe Tabor. History Colorado. Retrieved from https://www.historycolorado.org/story/womens-history/2021/04/01/silver-queen-cloud-city

Klien, Kathryn. (2/27/2015) Baby Doe Tabor: The Matchless Girl’s Wedding Dress. History Colorado. Retrieved from https://www.historycolorado.org/story/stuff-history/2015/02/27/baby-doe-tabor

Elizabeth Bonduel McCourt “Baby” Doe Tabor. babydoe.org. Retrieved from https://www.babydoe.org/babydoe.htm

Baby Doe Tabor. (9/16/2021) Colorado Bureau of Land Management blog. Retrieved from https://www.blm.gov/blog/2021-09-16/baby-doe-tabor

Morrow, Deb and Erin Osovets. (9/18/2020) Central City Opera.org. Retrieved from CentralCityOpera.org/the-true-wild-tale-of-baby-doe-tabor

Purchase Link: https://books2read.com/DelilahWIW

About the Author

Kaye Lynne Booth lives, works, and plays in the mountains of Colorado. With a dual emphasis M.F.A. in Creative Writing and an M.A. in Publishing, writing is more than a passion. It’s a way of life. She’s a multi-genre author, who finds inspiration from the nature around her, and her love of the old west, and other odd and quirky things which might surprise you.

She has short stories featured in the following anthologies: The Collapsar Directive (“If You’re Happy and You Know It”); Relationship Add Vice (“The Devil Made Her Do It”); Nightmareland (“The Haunting in Carol’s Woods”); Whispers of the Past (“The Woman in the Water”); Spirits of the West (“Don’t Eat the Pickled Eggs”); and Where Spirits Linger (“The People Upstairs”). Her paranormal mystery novella, Hidden Secrets, and her short story collection, Last Call and Other Short Fiction, are both available in both digital and print editions at most of your favorite book distributors.

In addition, she keeps up her authors’ blog, Writing to be Read, where she posts reflections on her own writing, author interviews and book reviews, along with writing tips and inspirational posts from fellow writers. Kaye Lynne has also created her own very small publishing house in WordCrafter Press, and WordCrafter Quality Writing & Author Services, where she offers quality author services, such as publishing, editing, and book blog tours. She has served as a judge for the Western Writers of America and sitting on the editorial team for Western State Colorado University and WordFire Press for the Gilded Glass anthology and editing Weird Tales: The Best of the Early Years 1926-27, under Kevin J. Anderson & Jonathan Maberry.

In her spare time, she is bird watching, or gardening, or just soaking up some of that Colorado sunshine.

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Thank you very much for your visit!

Have a wonderful week!

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