Category Archives: #SoSC

SoCS – Hairpins

Linda G Hill at Life in Progress said, “Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “pin.” Use it as a noun, use it as a verb, use it any way you’d like. Have fun!”

Here are two of the seven rules:

1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing (typos can be fixed), and minimal planning on what you’re going to write.

2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop.

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I have medium-length hair most of my life except a few years when short hair was in style.

When I was in elementary school, my hair was at the shoulder length. I parted the hair on the left and pin up the front to the right. I looked at my childhood pictures and noticed the curled end because my hair has natural waves.

Some movies remind me of the hairstyles I once had. When I was a teenager, I looked like a young adult because of the hairdos. The following are the hairstyles I tried, not in a particular order.

I remember having the flicked-up style for my medium-length hair. I used large rollers to roll all around the end of the hair outward to create the flick-up. Since my hair has natural waves, I had the advantage to hold the flick-up all day.

I also had the beehive style. The beehive style is to make the hair have an exaggerated look, which involved scraping a small amount of hair at a time, then applied the hairspray all over before combing the outer layer to make it look like a beehive. Some ladies still wear that style if their hair is short and thin but want to make it look thick and full. With my medium-length thick hair, beehive style made me look like wearing a hat piece.

The bun hairstyle was fun to make, and I wore a single bun in the back near the top of my head. I first put up a ponytail, then divided up the hair into the top half and bottom half. For each half, I wrapped the hair around my finger and tugged the end inside toward the center, then pin the hair with hairpins to create a donut shape bun.

I liked the simple and clean look of the Pageboy style, but it had to maintain a certain length to keep the style.

I take pride in my thick, somewhat wavy, and long hair. The longest hair I had was at the midway between my shoulder and the waist. During the six months of chemotherapy for my cancer in 2009, I lost about 80% of the hair gradually. I know many people shave their heads, but I didn’t want to do that. When going out for a walk or go to meetings, I wore a hat. The hair was getting thinner and thinner, and I treasured every strand. At one point, my husband said I looked like a punk. There were a few strands longer than the rest. With great effort, I trimmed it to make the end look more even.

My daughter was coming from Portland, Oregon to visit me in the summer at the end of my chemo treatment. I didn’t want to shock her with my look. Every two months, I took the side view and the back view of my head showing the gradual loss of hair to prepare her visit.

It took two years for my hair to grow back to the length I wanted.

When I have my hair trimmed, usually I want to keep the length, but have it layered. Once I had a guy trimming my hair. Even after I described to him how I wanted it done, he kept trimming it and trimming it. When it was done, my hair was short. I was so mad. What made me more upset was when he said, “Short hair looks good for your age.” What a jerk!

I don’t want a guy to do my hair unless he also has long hair!

2019-2020 SoCS Badge by Shelley! https://www.quaintrevival.com/

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Have a Wonderful Week!

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SoCS – My Books Are Yours

Linda G. Hill at Life in progress posted the SoCS prompt on Friday, “Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is ‘my.’ Start your post with the word ‘My.’ Bonus points if you end your post with ‘yours.’ Enjoy!

Here are two of the seven rules:

1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing (typos can be fixed), and minimal planning on what you’re going to write.

2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop.

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My granddaughter Autumn will turn four on September 28, 2021. It’s amazing to watch how she learned during this young age.

As a teacher, I paid more attention to her reading development. My daughter Mercy and her husband, Will, started reading bedtime stories to her as soon as baby Autumn came home from the hospital. They wanted to establish the habit of reading to her. Books made with cloth or plastic are part of her toys. It turned out that Autumn developed the love of reading at a very young age. Before she turned two, she seemed to prefer books rather than the manipulative toys. Mercy had age-appropriate toys around for her, but she picked up books to flip the pages more often than to press the buttons for the musical toys. Her favorite books when she was around one year old were a set of ten nursery rhyme 2”x2” books. They were the right size for her small hands. She picked out the books one at a time, brought it to us, turned around and set on our laps. We sang the nursery rhymes to her as we flipped the pages. When we read her the picture books, she had her favorite pictures such as ball, apple, ducks, or dog. After we turned the pages further into the book, she flipped the pages back and pointed to the pictures to say the names. She seemed to focus on the details of the pictures and looked at them with intensity.

Autumn has kept up her interest in books. By three years old, she had a long attention span to listen to books with over 1,000 words. Even though she didn’t understand the concept or meaning of all the sentences, she picked up some simple meaning and words she could relate to. When we repeated reading the same book, she would interact by saying the names of the characters or actions corresponding to the illustrations. As we repeated reading the same book, she remembered more details.

The thematic books she enjoyed and found them funny were the Magic School Bus books. During one visit several months ago (when she was three and a half), she flipped through the Magic School Bus book on dinosaurs. She could name all the dinosaurs. The book made learning fun by inventing funny names with illustrations. One picture has a sock as the head and a body of a dinosaur and named it Sockasaurus. Another picture has a banana head and names Bananasaurus. We made it fun by inventing our own, such as named the fingers, Fingerasaurus.

My daughter takes her to the library to check out books. They checked out as many books as the library tote bag could hold. It’s about twenty-five books. We read at least half of them as soon as we came home. When we go somewhere in the car, she wants to have an entire bag of books available to read. I remember when she was around three years old, before we used book bags, she insisted to bring many books to the car. We tried to tell her to bring just a few, but she picked out a stack of about ten large size books and carried them, walking from the house to the car on her little feet. Well, how can we discourage her from the love of books?

The books are her lullaby. She would read until she falls asleep.

For a short while, I worried that she would only read books but not keeping a balance between books and other activities and social skills. But my worries puffed away when I watched her playing well with friends, enjoys hiking, rock climbing, biking, camping, swimming and other adventurous activities.

I saved boxes of books from my teaching days. I go through the books and bring the interest and vocabulary appropriate books to her on my visits to her. She knows I have something for her every time. She would ask, “What is in your bag, Grandma?” I would take out the books and say, “These books are yours.”

2019-2020 SoCS Badge by Shelley! https://www.quaintrevival.com/

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Have a wonderful week!

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