Category Archives: Spain

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #121: Focus on the Subject

This week for Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #121, Patti shared “some helpful techniques from the experts that can help us create images that lead our viewers to our subject.”

Using Lines and repeated patterns to bring focus to the subject

At Valencia, Spain, we visited Hemisferic which is a splendid Laserium, Planetarium, and IMAX cinema (over 900 square meters of the screen). It is in the City of Arts and Sciences complex. The building was designed by Santiago Calatrava. The lines and repeated patterns draw the viewers’ attention to the shape of the eyes (one eye opened, one eye shut).

The tour bus arrived at a large parking lot. We entered a 124 m (407 ft) tunnel which leads to an ornate elevator that ascends the final 124 m (407 ft) to the building of Eagle’s Nest in Germany. The lines on the wall and the lights point to the elevator at the end of the tunnel.

Using colors and contrast to draw attention to the subject

The contrast light color of the flower and dark green background bring the attention to the single yellow Daffodil.

Using arches and doorways to frame the image

This is the St. Johns Bridge in Portland, Oregon. The bridge has a 1,207-foot (368 m) center span and a total length of 2,067 feet (630 m). The arches of the bridge towers framed the Gothic cathedral-like image. The adjacent park and neighborhood of Cathedral Park are named after this appearance.

Using freezing the moment to capture the subject

Hummingbirds flap the wings more than 60 times a second. I had fun freezing the moment of the hummingbird flapping the wings. My baby Ruby Throated hummingbird was in a “standing” still position.

Using the eyes to draw attention to the subject

I had fun finding the eyes of the animals for you to fall in love with them. The cat in the neighborhood, the deer, and the monkeys in Nara and Kyoto, Japan.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #121: Focus on the Subject

.

.

.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #116: Symmetry

This week, Patti invites us to explore Symmetry as a way to create dramatic and impactful images.  I made a quick review of symmetry in photography and learned something new. Thank you, Patti.

There are four most common types of symmetry in photography

Vertical Symmetry

Vertical symmetry is the most common type of symmetry. Draw an imaginary vertical line at the center of the photo, if both sides are symmetrical, your photo will look visually appealing. Vertical symmetry is often used in architectural photography.  It emphasizes the size, shape, and design of buildings.

This Tea Garden at a restaurant in Hong Kong in which my nephew and his wife had the tea ceremony before the wedding banquet.

Kasuga Grand Shrine in Nara, Japan, is famous for its many bronze lanterns, as well as the many stone lanterns that lead up the shrine.  

The Champ de Mars is one of the most beautiful, large public green spaces in Paris, France. This is one of the 360o views on the viewing level of the Eiffel Tower.

Horizontal Symmetry

Horizontal symmetry is often used in landscape photography. Especially when a body of water is present. This can be confused with reflective symmetry. The difference is that horizontal symmetry does not necessarily have to feature a reflection. Reflective symmetry always does.

The following beach photo shows the horizon reaching the sky, and the horizontal lines of the waves, and the line between the sand and water.

Seville was one of our stops during the Spain tour. This photo shows both vertical and horizontal symmetry. This is the Plaza de España in Seville built in 1928. It is a landmark example of Regionalism Architecture, mixing elements of the Baroque Revival, Renaissance Revival and Moorish Revival styles of Spanish architecture.

Radial Symmetry

Radial symmetry usually involves shapes that go round and round with the same patterns. This is often associated with ripples, succulents, domes, wheels, etc.

There are many circular layers in the Central Garden at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Reflective Symmetry

As its name suggests, reflective symmetry is all about reflections. We can find reflections in water, surfaces like glass, and buildings to create a mirror image.

This is the Patio de los Arrayanes in Alhambra, Spain. The image of the building is reflected in the pond.

Our favorite get away is the Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens in Los Angeles. This part of the Chinese Garden is reflected in the pond.

LENS-ARTISTS PHOTO CHALLENGE #116: SYMMETRY

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #98 – Delicate Colors

This week for Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #98, Ann-Christine invited us to look at the delicate colors. I include two sets of photos here.

The first set:

These are the full moon photos from January 31, 2018. I captured the full moon when it rose above the trees and buildings before it was too high in the sky. The distance would be greater when the moon is high. By zooming, I captured different colors and shades of the moon.

3.IMG_4849 2018.1.31

4.IMG_4846

5.IMG_4829

 

The second set:

The Magic Fountain of Montjuïc’s (Font màgica de Montjuïc in Catalan) at Barcelona, Spain is a spectacular display of color, light, motion, music, and water acrobatics. A mixture of these elements together in just the right combinations is pure magic.

We were there in the summer of 2016 to celebrate our anniversary. The tour guide secured a spot for us to get a great view.

1.IMG_b2 (2)2.IMG_b3b (2)3.IMG_7729

 

Here is a short video. I hope you don’t get a motion sickness because I moved the camera to adjust the height of the water!!

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge#98 – Delicate Colors

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: #21 Splash!

My husband and I went to Spain in the summer of 2016 to celebrate 20th anniversary. The tour covered Madrid, Toledo, Seville, Cordoba, Granada, Valencia and Barcelona. We were in Barcelona on the day of anniversary. Most of the restaurants were open for dinner late in the evening but we preferred early dinner. After walking on the street for half an hour, we found a restaurant serving pizza. We had a bottle of wine and a large pizza.

The tour guide took us to a water show at night and we watched a spectacular show with beautiful splashes.

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge: #13 Look Up

When I saw Patti’s prompt for Lens-Artist Photo Challenge: #13 Look Up. I know exactly what photos I have for this post.

Among all the countries we’ve traveled, Spain is one country where I spent a lot of time “looking up.” I love the Spanish architecture in general and I was most impressed with the architecture of cathedrals. When we visited the Great Mosque of Córdoba, I was walking with my head tilted, looking up and taking photos to an extent that I lost my tour group. I was panic because that place is enormous. The tour guide took the group to go from one Chapel to the other. Fortunately (most of the time), I could locate my 6’4″ husband. I quickly rejoined the group.

It was fun finding the photos from my Spain trip for this post.

1. Sagrada Familia Cathedral Barcelona

Antoni Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia Cathedral in Barcelona

Read more

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Columns and Vertical Line(s)

In August 2016, my husband and I traveled to Spain for our 20th Anniversary. We joined a tour to visit Madrid, Toledo, Seville, Cordoba, Granada, Valencia and Barcelona. I did several posts about our travel right after we came back. I love the architecture in Spain. For this post, I show several photos of columns and vertical lines.

Church of Santa María la Blanca Toledo 1

Church of Santa María la Blanca Toledo, Spain

Cathedral in Cordoba.Spain 1

Catherdral and former Great Mosque of Cordoba, Spain

Cordoba.Spain

Cordoba, Spain

opera house Madrid 1

Opera House, Madrid, Spain

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Columns and Vertical Line(s)