Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70: Monochrome – B&W

For this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70, Patti is inviting us to explore the world of monochrome–which includes black and white and sepia, as well as different shades of one color.

This is my second post of this theme. I include the black and white photos from my archives.

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murtle tree

Fountain 3

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70: Monochrome – B&W

 

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70: Monochrome – Color

For this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70, Patti is inviting us to explore the world of monochrome–which includes black and white and sepia, as well as different shades of one color.

In this post, I include the  roses, plums and apples from my garden. The roses show different shades from buds to full blossom. They also show different shades when reflecting the intensity of sunlight throughout the day. There are two photos of green apples and plums before ripening and one photo of the ripe plums.

 

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Pink Rose in day time

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Green plums and shades of green leaves

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Green apples and shades of green leaves

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Yellow rose

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A different yellow rose

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Ripe plums, some are more ripe than the others

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Pink rose at sunset (different rose from the one above)

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70: Monochrome – Color

 

 

 

 

Welcome to Part 2 of “THE MEREST LOSS” Blog Tour! @StevenNeil12 @4WillsPub #RRBC

I’m excited to welcome part 2 of “THE MEREST LOSS” Blog Tour! @StevenNeil12 @4WillsPub #RRBC.

 

Steven Neil header

 

Please join me to meet Steven Neil, the author of THE MEREST LOSS, and let me introduce you to his book.

 

First, let’s get to know Steven Neil and his writing Influences.

1. What has influenced you as a writer?

I am influenced by all the great writers of all the great books I have ever read. To

name just a few: The Remains of the Day, Kazuo Ishiguro; Tess of the D’Urbervilles,

Thomas Hardy; The Catcher in the Rye, J.D.Salinger; Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier;

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Le Grand Meaulnes, Alain-Fournier. Amongst

contemporary writers Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel has influenced my writing style the

most.

2. What is the first book you remember reading?

Anna Sewell: Black Beauty

3. What are your favorite books?

I give different answers at different times! All the books in the Palliser series and

Barchester Chronicles series by Anthony Trollope. To my mind he is the greatest of

the great nineteenth century English writers.

4. Who has influenced you as a writer?

All the books and writers I have mentioned and my Open University writing tutor

Judith Allnatt, who I credit with teaching me the craft of writing.

5. Are there any authors you try to emulate?

I haven’t consciously tried to do this, but I’m flattered when reviewers compare The

Merest Loss to a ‘classic nineteenth century’ novel.

6. What genres do you like to read?

I read many genres, but I find I am drawn back to the nineteenth century more and

more. I like a good story well told and I find the pyrotechnics of many contemporary

writers off putting.

7. Is this the same as the genre you write in?

In a way, yes. I write historical fiction set in the Victorian era.

8. What point of view do you like to write from?

I like the immediacy of first-person narration but I am most comfortable with

omniscient third person writing.

9. What tense do you like to write in?

I particularly like to read the present tense and I like to write that way too.

10. What made you write?

My wife inspired me to write, having found a short I wrote many years ago, aged 17.

She encouraged me to enroll in a creative writing course. This turned into an Open

University degree in English Literature, then a Master’s degree in Creative Writing

and eventually led to my debut novel, The Merest Loss.

© Steven Neil

 

Steven Neil

 

Author Bio

Steven has a BSc in Economics from the London School of Economics, a BA in English Literature and Creative Writing from the Open University and an MA in Creative Writing from Oxford Brookes University. He has been a bookmaker’s clerk, bloodstock agent, racehorse breeder and management consultant amongst other professions in his varied career. He is married and lives in rural Northamptonshire, England. The Merest Loss is his debut novel.

 

 

Blurb

A story of love and political intrigue, set against the backdrop of the English hunting shires and the streets of Victorian London and post-revolutionary Paris.

When Harriet Howard becomes Louis Napoleon’s mistress and financial backer and appears at his side in Paris in 1848, it is as if she has emerged from nowhere. How did the English daughter of a Norfolk bootmaker meet the future Emperor? Who is the mysterious Nicholas Sly and what is his hold over Harriet?

Can Harriet meet her obligations and return to her former life and the man she left behind?

What is her involvement with British Government secret services? Can Harriet’s friend, jockey Tom Olliver, help her son Martin solve his own mystery: the identity of his father?’

Genres: Historical Fiction and Victorian Historical Romance

 

Buy links

THE MEREST LOSS is available in paperback and eBook in the UK, US, France, Canada and Australia.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Merest-Loss-Steven-Neil-ebook/dp/B077D9SHB5

https://www.amazon.com/Merest-Loss-Steven-Neil-ebook/dp/B077D9SHB5

https://www.amazon.fr/Merest-Loss-English-Steven-Neil-ebook/dp/B077D9SHB5

https://www.amazon.ca/Merest-Loss-Steven-Neil-ebook/dp/B077D9SHB5

https://www.amazon.com.au/Merest-Loss-Steven-Neil-ebook/dp/B077D9SHB5

 

Follow Steven Neil for information on how to purchase the paperback through an independent bookseller in the UK

Twitter: https://twitter.com/stevenneil12

IAN author page: https://www.independentauthornetwork.com/steven-neil.html

Email: stevenneil1@aol.com

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To follow along with the rest of the tour, please visit the author’s tour page on the 4WillsPublishing site.  If you’d like to book your own blog tour and have your book promoted in similar grand fashion, please click HERE

 

 

 

 

Flights of Fancy – Serialisation – #Fantasy #Romance – The Other Side of Heaven by Sally Cronin – Free Book Offer

Sally generously offers her book Flights of Fancy for free. Head over to read the recent review by James J. Cudney IV, and email Sally at Sally.cronin@moyhill.com to request a copy.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Since I have just received a lovely review for Flights of Fancy, which was my first short story collection published in 2009 in paperback and audio with a later ebook edition. The stories were written over twenty years and scribbled down on odd pieces of paper… Over the next few weeks I shall be sharing the stories on Saturday and Sunday.

If you would like to read Flights of Fancy in one sitting rather than each week, please email me on sally.cronin@moyhill.com and just let me know if you would like it in Kindle or Epub format. No strings attached.

The Other Side of Heaven

When Meg saw the cottage she knew that it was the one. She had visualised her dream house so many times in her head that it almost felt that she was coming home.

As soon as she had walked down the country lane that…

View original post 1,564 more words

WELCOME TO THE #RRBC 2019 OCTOBER-WEEN BLOCK PARTY Winners

 

Hello and Welcome to the #RRBC 2019 October-ween Block Party. At each stop on the tour, there will be Daily Giveaway Prizes. At the end of the entire tour, there will be Grand Prize Winners!

Here are the prizes at this stop:

1) A $10 Amazon gift card and a copy of my eBook Songs of Heartstrings

Winner: Beem Week  https://beemweeks.wordpress.com

2) A $10 Amazon gift card and a copy of my eBook Songs of Heartstrings

Winner: James J. Cudney IV https://thisismytruthnow.com

3) A $10 Amazon gift card and a copy of my eBook Songs of Heartstrings

Winner: John W. Howell https://johnwhowell.com

There are 3 gifts for 3 Winners!

All you have to do to enter is leaving a comment below.

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Here is the topic of the post today

Why do people write poetry?

The earliest poetry is believed to have been recited or sung, used as a way of remembering oral history, genealogy, and law. Aristotle’s Poetics identified three major genres:

1) The epic poetry is the oldest poetry which is a lengthy narrative poem involving a time beyond living memory of the extraordinary doings of the extraordinary men and women. It described their dealings with the gods or other superhuman forces and gave shape to the moral universe for their descendants.

2) Lyric poetry is a formal poetry which expresses personal emotions or feelings, typically spoken in the first person. The term derives from Ancient Greek literature; the lyric was a musical accompaniment, usually on a stringed instrument known as a lyre.

3) Dramatic poetry or Verse drama is any drama written as verse to be spoken; another possible general term is the poetic drama. For a very long period, the verse drama was the dominant form of drama in Europe. Greek tragedy and Racine’s plays are written in verse, as is almost all of Shakespeare’s drama.

During the 20th-century and 21st-century there are disputes among the traditional forms and structures for poetry and the distinction between poetry and prose. The elements of traditional poetry include prosody, rhythm, meter, metrical patterns and rhyme. The forms of poetry comprise lines, patterns and rhyme. Prose is a natural flow of speech. However, as T. S. Eliot noted, whereas “the distinction between verse and prose is clear, the distinction between poetry and prose is obscure.” Free verse is an open form of poetry. It does not use consistent patterns, rhyme, or any musical pattern. It follows the rhythm of natural speech. Most free verse maintains the poetic convention of the poetic lines. T. S. Eliot wrote, “No verse is free for the man who wants to do a good job.”

My favorite lyrics are from hymns and songs. This is one of the songs with the lyrics based on Psalm 8.

 

 

Most of the poems in my poetry collection are in free verse. I also write in various poem forms. Here are some examples of poem forms included in the book.

 

Light and Dark

 

The end of the tunnel was in sight

Travel on a long journey found not in vain

Energizing my weary body moved toward the light

 

The road taken was not one I had chosen

Unexpected trails and body half frozen

The end of the tunnel was in sight

 

Trotting in darkness with heavy feet

Hope, my only strength to pick up the beat

Energizing my weary body moved toward the light

 

Long hall of darkness with pain in veins

Comforting in the heart stopped me from fainting

The end of the tunnel was in sight

 

Throbbing pain head to toes subsided

Medication and nutrition worked two-sided

Energizing my weary body moved toward the light

 

Six months of cancer treatment had completed

Only follow-up appointments needed repetition

The end of the tunnel was in sight

Energizing my weary body moved toward the light

 

The highly structured Villanelle is a 19-line poem with two repeating rhymes and two refrains. The form is made up of five tercets followed by a quatrain. The first and third lines of the opening tercet are repeated alternately in the last lines of the succeeding stanzas; then in the final stanza, the refrain serves as the poem’s two concluding lines.  

 

WONDER

 

Whispering into my ear

Of passionate words to hear

Needing me in your life

Day after day, night after night

Embracing me against your chest

Reassuring me for worst or best

 

An acrostic poem is a type of poetry where the first, last or other letters in a line spell out a word or phrase. The most common and simple form of an acrostic poem is where the first letters of each line spell out the word or phrase.

 

I appreciate your visit and comment!

 

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Challenge #69 – Seeing Double

Tina for Lens-Artists Challenge #69 said, “Double trouble, double-time, two’s company, take two ….  the world is filled with references to twosomes. This week, let’s double our pleasure and focus on things that come in twos.”

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The following photos are from our trip to Hong Kong and Japan in January this year.

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There are more than 300 kinds of gold fish, Ocean Park, Hong Kong

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These two pups enjoyed each other, Ocean Park, Hong Kong

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Flamingos – amazing animals at Kowloon Park, Hong Kong

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Decoration at the entrance of the hotel, Kyoto, Japan

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Monkey Park at the top of Arashiyama, Kyoto, Japan

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These reindeer were waiting for food from the visitors in the Reindeer Park, Nara, Japan

 

Lens-Artists Challenge #69 – Seeing Double

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #67 – Candid

Ann-Christine has a fun theme for us this week for the Lens-Artists Challenge. We get to look at the candid photo.

Ann-Christine said, “Taking photos of people or animals when they have no idea that you’re doing it is called candid photography. One of the beautiful things with photography is being able to catch someone in the act. It adds natural life to your pictures.” 

 

1.You did what Took my donut photo

“You did what? You took that doughnut photo? Now everyone knows about it.”

“A good snapshot keeps a moment from running away.” ― Eudora Welty

 

2.Is that how I look when I don't pose

“I looked funny when I laughed, but thanks for the photo anyway.”

“The best thing about a picture is that it never changes, even when the people in it do.” Andy Warhol

 

3.Ahhh, I can go from here to there without touching the ground

“Ahhh, I wasn’t that scared of the crowd!”

“Photography is the story I fail to put into words.” – Destin Sparks

 

4.What do mom and grandma put in their purses

“Hmmm, let me see what Mommy and Grandma put in their purses.”

“You can look at a picture for a week and never think of it again. You can also look at a picture for a second and think of it all your life.” ― Joan Miró

 

5.You need help.Nope I'm the flower girl

“Do you need help?”  “Nooo, I’m the flower girl!”

“In photography there is a reality so subtle that it becomes more real than reality.”
Alfred Stieglitz

 

6.Come on I got plenty of seeds for all of you

“Don’t worry! I have plenty for all of you.”

“Photography is a way of feeling, of touching, of loving. What you have caught on film is captured forever… It remembers little things, long after you have forgotten everything.” – Aaron Siskind

 

7.Be quiet, he's taking a nap.

“Shhhh……”

“Taking pictures is like tiptoeing into the kitchen late at night and stealing Oreo cookies.” Diane Arbus

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #67 – Candid

 

 

 

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