Tag Archives: flowers

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #72–Waiting

This week, Amy invites us to the theme for Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #72–Waiting.

“There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heaven; a time to be born and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot.” Proverb 3:1-2

 

Waiting is a relative state. There is a time to wait and a time to go forward. Growing is a process that we can’t rush through. We must be patient with ourselves. Yet on the other hand, if we wait for the perfect moment to act, that moment may never come.

 

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House finches waiting to grow

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Mourning doves waiting to mature

“I had tended to view waiting as mere passivity. When I looked it up in my dictionary however, I found that the words passive and passion come from the same Latin root, pati, which means to endure. Waiting is thus both passive and passionate. It’s a vibrant, contemplative work. It means descending into self, into God, into the deeper labyrinths of prayer. It involves listening to disinherited voices within, facing the wounded holes in the soul, the denied and undiscovered, the places one lives falsely. It means struggling with the vision of who we really are in God and molding the courage to live that vision.” – Sue Monk Kidd

 

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Fairness is the sun to the nature that receives it.

“Whatever we are waiting for — peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance — it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart.” – Sarah Ban Breathnach

 

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Seize the moment to show the blossom

“Don’t Wait! Start on your dreams, your impulses, your longings, your special occasions today. Because this is your moment.” – Mary Anne Radmacher

 

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“Don’t be shy, show your inner beauty!”

“If you wait for tomorrow, tomorrow comes. If you don’t wait for tomorrow, tomorrow comes.” – Senegalese Proverb

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #72–Waiting

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70: Monochrome – B&W

For this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70, Patti is inviting us to explore the world of monochrome–which includes black and white and sepia, as well as different shades of one color.

This is my second post of this theme. I include the black and white photos from my archives.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70: Monochrome – B&W

 

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #66: Filling the Frame

For Lens-Artists Photo Challenge this week, Patti invited us to look at Filling the Frame. She demonstrated her photos of the differences of not filling the frame and filling the frame.

 

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The bees love sunflowers. This photo was taken in the summer 2018 as I waited to catch this position of the bee.

 

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There are many kinds of birds in my garden. I watch them and feed them and caught this House Finch cracking a sunflower seed.

 

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This photo was taken when we walked around Laguna Lake by our house. There were many turtles but this one was most handsome and colorful. This close-up shot allowed me to see its body texture and colors and the look on its face.

 

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There was a wildfire in Columbia Gorge in Washing, Oregon area in September 2017 caused by a 15-year-old boy igniting fireworks. The sky was covered with smoke. This was early in the afternoon.

 

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The human eyes usually cannot gaze directly to the sun. The smoke was intense and filtered the ray so we were able to look right at the sun.

 

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I used to study the moon cycles and paid attention to the Red Blood moon and the Blue moon. California is not a good location to glimpse the intensity of the colors of the moon. January 2018 was the first appearance of full moon of the year. This full moon photo was taken from our driveway early at night.

 

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This was taken at the same time of the night. I zoomed in to view the shadows of the moon.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #66: Filling the Frame

 

 

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #63 – My Magical Garden

Ann-Christine invited us to look at our Magical Garden this week for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #63.

I have written several posts about my magical garden. The hummingbirds, the flowers, the trees and the baby birds.

There were more baby birds in my magical garden. On August 13, 2019, A pair of Mourning Doves came to the previous occupied nest, checked it out and decided to use it. Mama bird laid two eggs and nurtured two babies. The bigger baby flew to the nearby bush. Then Mama, Papa and the bigger brother left.  I thought Mama would leave the younger one alone, but she came back to stay with him for a while. Later that afternoon, the younger one left the nest also. The amazing thing was, both babies came back to the nest to spend a night together. They were gone the next day afternoon. I never saw this behavior in the birds in all the years.

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“Everyone likes birds. What wild creature is more accessible to our eyes and ears, as close to us and everyone in the world, as universal as a bird?” – Nature historian Sr. David Attenborough

“Birds are a miracle because they prove to us there is a finer, simpler state of being which we may strive to attain.” – Douglas Coupland

“Birds are indicators of the environment. If they are in trouble, we know we’ll soon be in trouble.” – Roger Tory Peterson

 

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The summer is mild this year with only several hot days. The flowers in my garden delight me without demanding too much work. I posted many flowers previously. This is the first time I post the following flowers.

“If we could see the miracle of a single flower clearly our whole life would change.” – Buddha

“If I had a single flower for every time I think about you, I could walk forever in my garden.” – Claudia Adrienne Grandi

“Love is like a beautiful flower which I may not touch, but whose fragrance makes the garden a place of delight just the same.” – Helen Keller

 

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Vinca Valiant Apricot doesn’t require too much water. They are annual flowers, but with proper trimming, the new flowers grow in the following year.

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The Iceberg roses are not demanding attention. The dead flowers and stems fall automatically. I chose to trim them the same way I care for other roses.

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Geranium has gorgeous colors and blooms all year round. It’s a low maintenance plant. I trim them because I like to keep the bushes to certain sizes.

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge # 63 – My Magical Garden

 

 

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #53: Flowers

This is one year anniversary of Lens-Artists Photo Challenge. I want to thank Patti, Ann-Christine, Amy, Tina and their team effort to make the photo Challenge fun. To celebrate the anniversary, the theme for #53 can be individual’s choice or one of their suggestions. I chose to show some flowers.

Welcome to My Garden!

There are many kinds of flowers in my garden. Some are perennial and some annual. To make gardening manageable, I have mostly perennial flowers because they come back year after year. I just keep some spots for annual flowers to have fun planting new every year.

Our front yard and backyard were remodeled fifteen years ago, twelve rose bushes were planted. The original tags were gone and I don’t remember the names of most of the roses. I tried to keep the tags of twelve rose bushes planted after that. Since these twenty-four rose bushes are in different colors, I decided to have ten white iceberg roses on one side of the driveway.

There are about a dozen kinds of annual flowers not included in this post. Yes, I like flowers.

 

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Double Delight

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.” – Abraham Lincoln

 

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Hybrid Tea

“We are all dreaming of some magical rose garden over the horizon – instead of enjoying the roses blooming outside our windows today.” – Dale Carnegie

 

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Grateful Heart

“The rose speaks of love silently, in a language known only to the heart.” – Author Unknown

 

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Orange Hibicus

“Love is the flower you’ve got to let grow.” – John Lennon

 

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Pink Hibicus

 “Flowers… are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty out values all the utilities in the world.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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Daylily

“Where flowers bloom, so does hope.” – Lady Bird Johnson

 

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Clover flowers and their visitor

“Flowers are the music of the ground. From earth’s lips spoken without sound.” – Edwin Curran

 

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Sunflowers and their visitor

“A rose can never be a sunflower, and a sunflower can never be a rose. All flowers are beautiful in their own way, and that’s like women too.” – Miranda Kerr

 

Lens-Artists Challenge #53 – Flowers

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #50 – Tree Stories

This week Ann-Christine gave us the theme for Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #50 – Trees. Here are some of my tree stories.

I’m thankful for having many trees in our front yard and the garden in the back of the house.

Our county is named Orange County known for the orange groves.  In 1948, a vast forest of five million Valencia orange trees grew on 67,000 acres. The postwar population boom triggered an almost wholesale conversation of farmland to suburbia.

Our home was built before 1948 with an orange tree planted in the backyard. The Valencia tree produces two crops a year yielding several hundreds of oranges each crop. The juice we squeeze and freeze from each crop lasts for four months.

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I planted two plum trees in my garden several years ago. The plum blossoms start earlier than any flowers. In 2017, when the trees were mature and started having full blossoms, I worried there were no bee attracting flowers to pollinate the plum blossoms. Well, I said there were no bee attracting flowers around, it was not entirely true. There were clovers with yellow flowers but yellow was not my favorite color of flowers. To one person is flower, to another person is weed. I consider clovers weed and always pulled them to give room for planting other flowers. That year, after I pulled two handful from the slope blanketed with clovers, I spotted bees. I was surprised and happy, but sorry for what I did. I quickly plugged the clovers back to the soil. Ever since then, I leave a large area on the slope for clovers.

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This year, with five months of winter rain, both plum blossoms and clovers grow wild. There are several hundreds of plums on each tree.

(Note: The heavy rain throughout the winter boosted the growth of the plums. When they started ripening. For the sake of curiosity, I tallied as I picked them. From June 16 to July 15, 2019, one thousand and one hundred plums (1100) were picked. What a year!)

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Without giving too much thought on many kinds of apples, I planted a Granny Smith apple tree several years ago. It turned out that Granny Smith apples were too sour for me to eat. My friends recommended to use them to make apple pies. We don’t eat pies too much for health reason. I ended up chopping down the tree and planted a Red Delicious apple tree. The tree is three years old with thin branches, but with the help of heavy rain this year, there are a couple hundreds of apples. I had to use heavy sticks to pop up the weighed down branches.

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Cypress trees require little water to grow to a maximum of 100 feet tall and 20 feet wide. Many homes use them as natural fence for privacy or border of the property. We grow them for privacy reason. The home on the hill on the top of our slope has the backyard facing our second story. Even though people don’t purposely intrude other people’s homes, we wanted to have the added beauty of the trees and privacy.

There are three Hibiscus trees, two in the garden in the back of the house and one in the side yard. Hibiscus tree has gorgeous flowers without requiring too much water. I used to water them the same way I did for other trees and flowers. Then I noticed white flies growing from the back of the leaves. My gardener asked me to rinse the leaves with soapy water. I got rid of the white flies with soapy water, but I decided not to water the trees at all. Since the roots of the trees are deep and draw water from the deep soil, the trees grow beautifully with dark green leaves and bright color flowers.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #50 – Tree Stories

 

 

 

 

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