Tag Archives: Hong Kong

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly Poetry Challenge – Slow & Work

Here is this week’s Colleen’s 2019 Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge No. 121, “Slow & Work,” #SynonymsOnly

January 12 to 20, 2019, a group of family members from West Coast of the U.S.A. traveled to Hong Kong to celebrate my nephew’s wedding, a joyous begging of a new journey. It was a marathon ceremony of playing Chinese traditional games when the groom picked up the bride in the morning. The games were set by the bridesmaids and responded by the groom and best men. Only when all the games were responded, the door was open for the groom to pick up the bride. Then a modern church wedding and garden cake ceremony were held in the afternoon, and a nine-course Chinese banquet was served in the evening when the bride and mother-in-law (my sister) changed their gowns four times.

 

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #30 – Unexpected

Anne-Christine asks us to show how we interpret “Unexpected.”

My trip to Hong Kong and Japan was filled with unexpected experiences. Even though I grew up in Hong Kong, nothing is the same as the place I left it years ago. During our nine-day stay, we were accompanied by family members to go places. I found all these places new to me except remembering some of the street names.

I only include some photos of a few places we visited..

Kowloon Park is the largest park in Hong Kong. I couldn’t believe seeing flamingos there.

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We found a huge indoor playground for Autumn to run around.

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The Biggest Change: Times Past

Irene Waters hosts a monthly memoir post – Time Past. The theme for this month is The Biggest Change.

My mom is the Silent Generation and I am the Baby Boomer.

I have many stories to tell about the biggest change in my mom’s life as well as in my life. For this post, I write about the biggest change in my life within a few months in 1977. The changes in culture, environment, language, and ways of life happened to me all at once.

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I worked several years after graduated from college. I took the Double-Decker bus to work. It went from Kowloon to the underwater Crossed Harbour tunnel, then to  Causeway Bay, Hong Kong. At that time, there were no cell phones, I did my reading on the bus.

Being busy was an understatement. I worked forty hours a week in my paying job plus twenty hours a week volunteering at a church. I did most of the mental planning on the bus. It was an advantage to take public transportation. On some of the weeknights, I went window shopping to take my mind off the working mode. I did a thirty-minute walk from Pioneer Centre Shopping Arcade to Kowloon Central Post Office on Nathan Road, then took a bus home.

It was eleven thirty o’clock at night when I went to bed. The more I tried to relax the more anxious I got in my head. Getting six hours of sleep was fortunate before I shook my head to wake up the next morning.

On March 21, 1977, I arrived in Portland, Oregon to attend school for my graduate studies. The campus was surrounded by pine trees reaching into the sky. The school owned some housings and rented them to students. Many of the nearby residents rented out their homes to the students also. I shared a cottage with two female students. It was common that the basement and the attic were living areas if they met the legal requirement.  I lived in the attic, my housemates lived downstairs. I didn’t mind living in the attic because I was shy to carry on a conversation with my British English. My housemates were very friendly. We ate dinner together three times a week and took turns to do the cooking. Cooking was not something I did often in Hong Kong, so I tried to remember what my mom had done and did accordingly.

 “I’m living in a forest,” I told my family in a letter.

I had never experienced such quietness. It was so quiet that I started noticing the intermittent tinnitus in my left ear. This was an extremely different environment to the one I just left two days ago. My life was from running sixty miles an hour to almost a complete stop. In one minute, I was hustling and bustling to catch the bus; in another minute, I had nothing to do except going to classes and doing term papers.

Doing a typewritten paper was a challenge to me. I did all my writing in handwriting previously. When working on the first assignment, I learned to type with a manual typewriter and typed my paper at the same time. I didn’t want to type with two index fingers. How could I learn to type by doing that? By using ten fingers to type, it was inevitable to have many typos. There was no correction tape built into the typewriter, I used correction fluid. Experience taught me to apply a thin layer on the paper, not only for it to try faster, but avoid having a white hump on the paper.  Even when I typed after the fluid was dry, the dent would look like sticking the candles on the icing of a cake. It took me almost an hour to type my first page.

(Excerpt from my memoir in progress)

By the way, my first typewriter was orange. It looked almost the same as this image I found on Google search.

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Irene WatersThe biggest change: Times Past

Weekly Photo Challenge – A Face in the Crowd

Our family vacation to China and Hong Kong was a memorable trip. When I first made plan for the trip, we had ten people on the list. The travel agency was able to book a private tour with a van and our own driver. Our itinerary included Beijing, Xi’an, Guilin and Hong Kong. We flew from Los Angeles, U.S. to Beijing, China to start our tour. The travel agency made arrangement for the connecting flights and had local guide/driver pick us up from each city. Several weeks before the trip, three family members were not able to make it. With only seven of us, we thought the travel agency would put us in a large group. It was fortunate that we still could have our private tour.

During this trip, we saw faces everywhere. In this post I only include a few photos of Beijing and two photos of Hong Kong. At the Beijing airport, we were a small crowd with seven of us and a few people around. I love to take scenery photos, but in popular vacation places, it’s hard to take photos without including a crowd.

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In fact, Will, my son-in-law’s mom Kathy had never seen a big crowd such as the one she saw in Hong Kong, and she gave us a surprised look! The night life is full of energy in this city!

Weekly Photo Challenge – A Face in the Crowd

Thursday’s Special – Trace of the Past

The theme for Thursday’s Special is “Trace of the Past” by Paula.

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Hong Kong – A place where I spent my years from childhood to young adulthood.

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Lynton, Mercy, Will and I attended my nephew’s wedding. They followed the Chinese tradition to serve us tea in kneeling. We gave them Red Envelopes that contained the wedding gift.

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Paula’s Thursday’s Special – Trace of the Past

Cheung Chau, Hong Kong

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Cheung Chau is an outlier of Hong Kong. The area of this small island is 0.95 square mile (2.46 square meters) in the shape of a dumbbell. The population is about 22,740 in year 2011. It is an island with no cars. The major transportation is bicycles.

When I was living in Hong Kong 40 years ago, the regular ferry took about two hours to go from Hong Kong Island to Cheung Chau. The newer ferry takes about 55 minutes.  The fast ferry called hydrofoil takes about 35 minutes to get there.

Hong Kong is a major harbor of the world trade. There were pirates in the old days. When I was a teenager, the church youth group went there for an outing. We visited and crawled through the pirate’s tunnel.images

When standing on top of a tall building, one could have a nearly 360o view of the ocean. I always enjoy visiting Cheung Chau when I go to Hong Kong.

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Daily Prompt: Outlier

Dense City – Hong Kong

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March 21, 2017 marked my 40th year being in USA. I came from Hong Kong to Portland, Oregon as a student. The campus in Portland was surrounded by sky high pine trees. I remember telling my family that I was living in a forest!

Hong Kong has a special place in my heart. I spent my childhood, my teenage years and my young adulthood there. What I liked the most was everything was close by. Many places I wanted to go were within walking distance. Public transportation system was fabulous even when it was forty years ago. It was easy to get together with friends. One of my leisure things to do was walking miles in “downtown” Kowloon for window shopping.

Our flat was small. The refrigerator was small. We didn’t need a big refrigerator because my mom went to the market for every meal. We couldn’t be packrats, because there was no room for storage. The good thing was that we didn’t acuminate things we never used for years. We only kept what was essential to life.

I just did a little research on the density of population in the world. As of July, 2016, Hong Kong is the 4th dense city in the world. It has 427 square miles (1,106 square kilometers) of land. The population is 7,346,700 with 17,208 people per square mile or 6,644 people per square kilometers.

Population density chart

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People are everywhere in Hong Kong. I was born a city girl, and I am still a city girl. I enjoy traveling, but always want to come back to the city where I am living – southern California.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Dense

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