Tag Archives: Japan

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #51: Unique Nara Deer Park

The theme from Amy this week for Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #51 is: Unique. I want to post our unique experience in Japan.

Our family went to Kyoto, Japan in January 2019. While in Kyoto, we visited Nara Park.  

 

1.IMG_2583

 Nara Park is a public deer park located at the foot of Mount Wakakusa. Established in 1880, it is one of the oldest parks in Japan. The park, including the adjunct temples and gardens, is as large as 1,600 acres.

 

3.IMG_2588

Nara Park

5.IMG_2672

Kasugataisha Shrine

6.IMG_2646

Evergreen Botanical Garden

 

The wild sika deer are designated as natural treasures. They are freely roaming around the park.

 

1.1.IMG_2562

 

Visitors can purchase “deer-crackers” to feed them.

 

8.IMG_2569

9.IMG_2584

10.IMG_2593

11.IMG_2655

Well, this deer wanted to taste the ice cream

The number of deer grew to around 1,200 in 2008 and created concerns about environmental and crop damage.

 

IMG_2627

12.IMG_2629

 

During fiscal 2016, 121 people were injured by deer. In 2016 the area around Nara was designated into four different zones, with the outer zones allowing deer to be captured and killed. The culling started in 2017, with a limit of 120 deer to be culled during 2017.

As of July 2017, there were around 1,500 deer living in the park, and at least 164 people had been injured by them in fiscal 2017-2018. Most of them were tourists feeding the deer.

In April 2018 Nara city set up new signs in English, Chinese and Japanese informing tourists that the deer are wild animals and to not tease them during feeding.

I took the following video when a deer bowed to ask for food from visitors.

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #51: Unique Nara Deer Park

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #43–Less is More

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, the theme Amy gave us is:

“Less is More.”

 

We have heard of this phrase often. When I saw this theme, I was curious of the origin of the expression. The research took me to several places and I wanted to trace the origin. This is what I found out:

This is a 19th century proverbial phrase. It is first found in print in Andrea del Sarto, 1855, a poem by Robert Browning written to Lucrezia:

“Who strive – you don’t know how the others strive
To paint a little thing like that you smeared
Carelessly passing with your robes afloat,-
Yet do much less, so much less, Someone says,
(I know his name, no matter) – so much less!
Well, less is more, Lucrezia.”

 

The phrase is often associated with the architect and furniture designer Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe (1886-1969), one of the founders of modern architecture and a proponent of simplicity of style.

Simple architecture in Kyoto, Japan.

1.IMG_2683

Kasugataisya Shrine

Read more

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #30 – Unexpected

Anne-Christine asks us to show how we interpret “Unexpected.”

My trip to Hong Kong and Japan was filled with unexpected experiences. Even though I grew up in Hong Kong, nothing is the same as the place I left it years ago. During our nine-day stay, we were accompanied by family members to go places. I found all these places new to me except remembering some of the street names.

I only include some photos of a few places we visited..

Kowloon Park is the largest park in Hong Kong. I couldn’t believe seeing flamingos there.

img_1635

We found a huge indoor playground for Autumn to run around.

Read more

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #10: Fences

The theme for Lens-Artists Photo Challenge this week is Fences. There are fences near and far, close to home and around the globe. Some fences are made with rod iron, wood, stones, cement, plants, flowers, lava rocks or a combination of the above. The functions of the fences are to be for prohibition, protection, security, divider, or beauty. In this post, I have included some examples of the forms and functions of the fences.

1.1 Cherry Blossom Japan

Cherry blossoms between the stone and wooden fences in Japan.

Read more

April 19: Flash Fiction Challenge – The Final Forest Bathing

smile at carrot ranch

April 19, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about forest bathing. You can use the Japanese term, Shinrin Yoku, or you can make up your own ideas about the phrase. Go where the prompt leads.

Respond by April 24, 2018. Use the comment section below to share, read and be social. You may leave a link, pingback or story in the comments.

     

The Final Forest Bathing

Mr. Taniguchi hooked one end of the rope to his waist belt, attached the other to the entrance post of Aokigahara Forest located along the edge of Mount Fuji. He released the rolling rope as he proceeded, passing the sign of “No Entry.”

He saw many strings but found them ended in bushes. Hours into the patrol, he discovered a pair of weathered shoes. Brushing the leaves aside, a skeleton was revealed.

He took photos, got out several signs and nailed them on the trees. They read, “Don’t Commit Suicide. Your Life Is Precious.” He traced his way back.

 

Charli Mills Carrot Ranch – April 19: Flash Fiction Challenge

 

 

Wisteria Festival at Kameido Tenjin Shrine

Itchy Feet

IMG_0026 There are 100+ varieties hanging on 15 trellises. Wisteria flowers begin blooming all at once starting in late April to early May. These lovely lavender-colored flowers are comprised of several bunches and look stunning when dangled from trellises.

IMG_0013The best place to see them is KameidoTenjin Shrine, a Shinto shrine dedicated to the god of study. People visit the shrine not only to pray for success in examinations but also to enjoy the Fuji Matsuri (Wisteria Festival).

IMG_9281IMG_9324The shrine is also famous for its drum bridge, a highly arched pedestrian bridge associated with gardens in Japan. The temple grounds are reminiscent of the Edo period with a small lake complete with koi fish, turtles, and ducks lounging under a canopy of wisteria.IMG_0008

IMG_0021 Tokyo Sky Tree provides a perfect backdrop for the wisteria flowers The 634 meter high Tokyo Sky Tree looms in the background of the shrine and adds to…

View original post 115 more words