Tag Archives: Tuesday Photo Challenge

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Longleat, England

The theme for Frank’s Tuesday Photo Challenge this week is: Field

We went to London during our trip to Europe. We arrived five days prior to the tour group. My childhood friend and her husband took us sightseeing. This stately home reminds me of Downton Abbey!

Longleat is an English stately home in Somerset, England. It is an early example of the Elizabethan prodigy house. The house is set in 1,000 acres of parkland with 4,000 acres of let farmland and 4,000 acres of woodland. It was the first stately home to open to the public, and the Longleat estate includes the first safari park outside Africa.

The lovely cottage caught my attention and I took several photos of it. The last photo shows the monkeys freely roam in the safari park and climb on the cars that drive through a small area of the park.

c21 Longleat (2)

c22 Longleat (2)

c31 Longleat (2)

c34 Longleat Safari (2)

Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo: Tuesday Photo Challenge – Longleat, England

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Family Time Treat

My granddaughter Autumn is nine and a half months old. It is always a treat to visit Mercy, Will, and Autumn. I’m so blessed with the opportunity to visit them once a month so far. Autumn is growing fast and learning new things every day. During my visit from June 26 to July 3, 2018, I watched her eating peanut butter and jelly sandwich by herself. She is a good eater – eats everything given to her. She also started cruising. She took twenty steps on the second day of cruising.

Mercy, Autumn, and I went to a park and had a picnic lunch with Mercy’s friend who just had a six weeks old baby. Autumn had fun on the swing.

We also went to a small rose garden and Battle Ground Lake State Park. It was a fun-filled week for me.

Treat 2

Treat 3

Treat 1Treat 4

Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo: Tuesday Photo Challenge – Family Time Treat

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Heat Wave

On this Thursday afternoon, I was sitting in the dentist’s office when the local news channel announced the excessive heat wave hit southern California. It was 104o C at the time of the news report. It breaks the records since 1942.

The beachgoers had some relief by the cooler air on July fourth holiday yesterday. The high temperature will stay through Friday and Saturday. The heat watch will be in effect along the Central Coast including Ventura County, Orange County, Los Angeles County. It affects all the beaches and mountains in these counties. The news further reported that the Emergency Rooms will be on alert for receiving heat stroke patients.

Weather forecast warns that low humidity may elevate the risk of fire. The worse days of Friday and Saturday are still to come. The news urged people to reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening, and not to leave older people, kids, or pets in an enclosed area or cars for a lengthy period.

I hope the forecast and early warning will prevent certain avoidable disasters.

heat 1

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Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo: Tuesday Photo Challenge – Heat Wave

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Colorful Hummingbird

The ruby-throated baby hummingbird in my garden is doing well. He prefers nectar from lavender flowers, but there are not enough flowers to give him the amount of nectar he needs. Mama and Papa feed exclusively from my feeders.

There is a small potted ficus tree in front of the kitchen window underneath the hummingbird feeder. The lavender bush is about five feet from the ficus tree. Baby Hummi flew to the lavender flowers to get nectar. After feeding, he flies to the ficus tree and perches on his favorite spot of the branch until the next feeding. Papa flies around and swoops him up so he gets to fly one round of the palm trees. He quickly comes back to the ficus tree and perches on his spot.

Two days ago, he tried the sugar water from the feeder and liked it. He goes back and forth between the lavender flowers and the feeder. Papa comes by every twenty minutes to take him on flying lessons.

There was a baby hummingbird last year did the same thing. He perched on the ficus branch most of the time and the parent came by to take him flying. When the parents went south for the winter, the baby stayed behind to feed on my feeder throughout the winter.

I was curious about the migration of the hummingbird. I did a research this morning and found out that I will have the baby stay with us for the winter. The website also describes the colors of the birds.

Hummingbird 1

Hummingbird 2

Hummingbird 3

Hummingbird 4

Hummingbird 5

The Colorful Hummingbird

The ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) is a species of hummingbird that generally spends the winter in Central America, Mexico, and Florida, and migrates to North America for the summer to breed. It is by far the most common hummingbird seen in North America.

The adult male has a throat patch of iridescent ruby red bordered narrowly with velvety black on the upper margin and a forked black tail with a faint violet sheen. The red iridescence is highly directional and appears dull black from many angles. The female has a notched tail with outer feathers banded in green, black, and white and a white throat that may be plain or lightly marked with dusky streaks or stipples.

During migration southward in autumn along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico, some birds embark on a nonstop 900-mile journey. Some older male and female birds were better prepared for long-distance flight than first-year birds by having higher body weights and larger fuel loads.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby-throated_hummingbird

Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo: Tuesday Photo Challenge – Colorful Hummingbird

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Pin-tailed Whydah.New Bird in My Garden

Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo – New Bird in my Garden

I had a new visitor on June 17, 2018. It was a beautiful bird I hadn’t seen before. I was fascinated by its graceful long tail which is twice as long as its body. The sharp contrast of black and white feather with an orange beak wouldn’t escape anyone’s sight.

It happened I had the patio door open to take photos of the birds feeding. It flew into my garden. I grabbed the camera and tried to be in a hidden position so I wouldn’t scare the birds away. I only had 30 seconds before it flew away.

On the same day, De Wets Wild had a post about the same bird. I almost jumped out of my seat because the information of the bird came so timely. De Wets Wild told me that its tail is beautiful in the air. It was not within my sight when it flew away.

Following my photos, I copied a photo and the information from De Wets Wild’s post. Please visit his wonderful posts about the animals in the wild.

Whyhad bird 1

Whyhad bird 4

The post and one photo from De Wets Wild:

The little Pin-tailed Whydah (12cm long, without the tail, and weighing only about 15g) is most known for the aggressive nature of the breeding males, which carries tails almost double their own body length and have no qualms tackling birds many times their own weight, like doves and pigeons, over a food source or territory!

Pin-tailed Whydahs are brood parasites, meaning that the female lays her eggs (usually 1 or 2 but up to 4 at a time) in the nests of other birds, mostly small seed-eaters like waxbills, for them to raise the chicks, often after removing some or all of the host birds’ eggs. A single Pin-tailed Whydah female may lay up to 25 eggs in a season. Their breeding season stretches from spring to autumn. Males are polygamous and highly territorial. The chicks hatch after about 11 days of incubation and leave the nest at about 3 weeks old, staying with their host family for about another week before joining a Whydah group.

Their habitat ranges from savanna, grassland, reedbeds, and scrublands to suburban parks, orchards and gardens. They feed mostly on seeds and termites. In South Africa, they occur in all our provinces, though they’re rather sparsely distributed in the arid Northern Cape, while outside of our borders Pin-tailed Whydahs occur over most of the continent south of the SaharaThe IUCN considers the Pin-tailed Whydah to be of least concern.

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Antique

We have lived in the current house for twenty-five years. Most of the original furniture was recycled and replaced. We have two pieces of furniture with us still. One is the solid teak sideboard we acquired from an antique auction. I like it because of its elegant design. When we want to move it, after taking out all the drawers, it still needs four to six big guys to carry it. If I had lost the keys, I don’t know where to have the keys made because the keys are round instead of flat.

Another piece of aged old furniture is the dining table. We can’t move it around easily either. The 1/4-inch-thick baffled glass top needs four guys to lift it up and carry it. The frame and legs are brass. We only polish them when we have a party. Under the glass top is a one-piece mural carved on black surface lacquer wood. It depicts a scene of a prominent figure having a party with his wife, officials in his courtyard and served by many servants.

These are the two pieces of aged old – antique collections we continue to keep.

age 1

age 2

age 3

Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo: Tuesday Photo Challenge – Antique

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